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Design approaches are diverse among the Redress Design Award 2019 finalists, tackling a variety of textile waste types including damaged camping equipment, wedding dresses, uniform waste and end-of life restaurant table linens. Each finalist showcases in their own unique style the power of designers to transform waste. Meet and greet!

"Caution Line" by Carina Roca Portella. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Caution Line” by Carina Roca Portella. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Temper Magazine (The New Made In China) is excited to unveil the Redress Design Award 2019 Finalists — 10 emerging designers who have been shortlisted by the Redress International Judging panel from hundreds of applicants from across the globe ready to transform fashion’s waste into want.

Representing the cutting-edge of fashion creativity, the finalists, which include menswear designers for the first time in the competition’s history, now have just 11 weeks to bring their concepts to life before presenting their collections in Hong Kong on September 5, 2019, at the live Grand Final at CENTRESTAGE, where winners will be announced. 

Prepare to be dazzled! #inrandomorder

"The Leftovers" by Chan Meiyan. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“The Leftovers” by Chan Meiyan. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"The Leftovers" by Chan Meiyan. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“The Leftovers” by Chan Meiyan. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Chan Meiyan

Chan Meiyan is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019. She studied Fashion Design at ESMOD Paris, France and is currently working as a fashion designer. For her competition collection ‘Leftovers’, Meiyan took her inspiration from the wave of feminism that took Western fashion by storm in the early 1980s, breaking the ground for women to aspire to new roles in society.

Reconstructing secondhand wedding dresses from China, where women now embrace self-reliance in all aspects of their lives, she creates a collection of multi-functional and seasonal garments to fit modern lifestyles.

“There are approximately 10.6 million weddings every year in China. What if just 10 percent of those brides decided to donate their dresses for up-cycling? This would have a significant impact on the fashion industry’s carbon footprint”. Quote, Chan.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Reconstruction.
"Hong Kong Neon Signs" by Chan Jianfeng. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Hong Kong Neon Signs” by Chan Jianfeng. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

 

“Hong Kong Neon Signs” by Chan Jianfeng. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Chan Jianfeng

Chan Jianfeng is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019. He holds a BA in Fashion and Textile (Knitwear Design & Technology) from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and is currently working as a Research Assistant.

Chan’s Redress Design Award collection is inspired by the signature neon signs that give Hong Kong its renowned nightscape and reflect its vibrant lifestyle and culture. He applies up-cycling and reconstruction to colourful end-of-roll textiles, fabric scraps and secondhand garments creating a layered, asymmetric collection embellished with typography using eco-friendly inks and embroidery, further emulating the unique signage.

“I believe that as designers we have an obligation to develop more sustainable fashion. Through innovative design approaches we can restore a balance between human and nature and protect our limited resources.” Quote, Chan.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Up-cycling, Reconstruction.
"The Mourners" by Maddie Williams. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“The Mourners” by Maddie Williams. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

 

"The Mourners" by Maddie Williams. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“The Mourners” by Maddie Williams. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Maddie Williams

Maddie Williams is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019 and holds a BA in Fashion Design from Edinburgh College of Art in the UK. She is currently working as a junior designer at Pentland Brands.

For Maddie’s Redress Design Award collection, ‘The Mourners’, she draws on the vast loss of biodiversity, planetary health and our humanity. Maddie applies up-cycling and reconstruction techniques to reclaimed textiles, yarns and secondhand clothing, weaving them into zero-waste pieces that she constructs into her garments. Memento mori symbolism — the medieval Latin Christian theory and practice of reflection on mortality — is embedded within the textile and print designs to remind us that our time is running out to take action.

“I want to be able to use my skills and craft to raise awareness of the climate disaster we are facing and show that conscious clothing does not have to play it safe and be minimal – it can also excite and tell stories.” Quote, Williams.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Zero-waste, Up-cycling, Reconstruction.
"Indigo Blues" by Abby Gaskin. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Indigo Blues” by Abby Gaskin. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

 

"Indigo Blues" by Abby Gaskin. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Indigo Blues” by Abby Gaskin. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

 

Abby Gaskin

Abby Gaskin is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019 and is currently studying a BFA, majoring in Fashion Design at Parsons School of Design, U.S.

For her competition collection ‘Indigo Blues’, Abby is inspired by the layered, woven wigs that powerful French women such as Marie Antoinette wore in the 1780s. Her zero-waste design process was a driving force from the get-go, dictating shapes and silhouettes. For her approach, Abby connects simple rectangles through hand knitting and hand weaving, up-cycling materials such as bed sheets, secondhand textiles and surplus yarns.

“I started with the end in mind and designed patterns that have modularity and can be simply re-assembled in different ways  to extend the garment’s life. By connecting rectangles with looped yarn, my designs can be disassembled and reassembled, building new shapes to make completely new garments”. Quote, Gaskin.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Zero-waste, Up-cycling.

“Caution Line” by Carina Roca Portella. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"Caution Line" by Carina Roca Portella. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Caution Line” by Carina Roca Portella. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Carina Roca Portella

Carina Roca Portella is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019. She has a BA in Fashion Design from ESDI, Barcelona and an MA in Creative Direction and Advanced pattern Making from IDEP, Barcelona. Carina is currently back at ESDI, studying for her second MA in Styling, Image and Communication.

In her Redress Design Award collection entitled ‘Caution Line’ Carina channels the spirit of non-conformism and self-expression, and is inspired by the inner-strength that is created by joining groups of like-minded people. Carina hopes to galvanise this collective force through her clothing which features printed statements. She up-cycles end-of-rolls, cut-and-sew waste and end-of-life restaurant napkins and tablecloths, adding fun care instructions within to engage the wearer to keep clothing in use for longer.

“I aim to empower others to become conscious consumers and change the way they perceive sustainability. Knowledge is power. We, as fashion designers, should raise awareness of the negative impacts caused by the fashion industry and encourage people to change their buying habits.” Quote, Portella.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Up-cycling.
"Anna Meets X" by Anna Schuster. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Anna Meets X” by Anna Schuster. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

 

"Anna Meets X" by Anna Schuster. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Anna Meets X” by Anna Schuster. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Anna Schuster

Anna Schuster is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019. She has an MA in Fashion Futures from London College of Fashion and a BA in Fashion Design from Mediadesign Hochschule München. She is currently working as a Menswear Concept Design Intern at Hugo Boss.

For her Redress Design Award Collection ‘Anna meets X’, Anna is influenced by what surrounds her as a designer, taking inspiration from other ‘maker’s’ disciplines through the discovery of crafts such as crochet, repair and patchworking. She applies zero-waste, up-cycling and reconstruction techniques to manipulate various types of surplus, damaged and stained textile waste and yarns into her contemporary menswear collection.

“I am ready to challenge the current fashion industry model to prove that fashion and nature can exist in harmony. We are taking too much from the planet and I want to give back to nature through innovative design thinking and creativity.” Quote, Schuster.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Zero-waste, Up-cycling, Reconstruction.
"Rangavalli" by Damini Mittai. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Rangavalli” by Damini Mittai. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"Rangavalli" by Damini Mittai. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Rangavalli” by Damini Mittai. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Damini Mittai

Damini Mittai is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019 and has a Post Graduate Diploma in Fashion Design from the Pearl Academy in Delhi. She is currently working as an Assistant Designer while developing her own sustainable brand.

Aiming to foster a connection with consumers and the land, Damini’s competition collection ‘Rangavalli’ is inspired by the land’s sacred value in Indian culture, particularly in her hometown Palamaner, where terracotta made from the soil has provided a source of income for centuries. Damini up-cycles a variety of waste textiles including cut-and-sew waste, secondhand and unsold clothing waste and surplus threads. Each of her designs is reversible creating versatility for the wearer.

“As both a fashion consumer and creator it is essential for me to design holistic solutions to the problems within the industry, and creating awareness amongst consumers is the first step towards sustainability. Consumers have to start looking at clothes not just as commodities but as living items with a lifecycle that can negatively impact  our environment over time.” Quote, Mittai.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Zero-waste, Up-cycling
"HOME" by Moriah Ardila. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“HOME” by Moriah Ardila. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"HOME" by Moriah Ardila. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“HOME” by Moriah Ardila. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Moriah Ardila

Moriah Ardila is the winner of the Redress Design Award 2019 People’s Choice and a finalist of the competition. She is currently studying Fashion Sustainability at Shenkar College of Engineering and Design in Israel.

Moriah’s competition collection ‘Home’ draws inspiration from outdoor living in non-urbanised areas of the world where people are more attuned to nature and its connection to us. Damaged camping equipment, such as sleeping bags and tents form the materials of her designs and are up-cycled into modern clothing items that retain parts of their original functionality.

“Sustainable fashion can significantly change the way the public currently thinks of fashion as a disposable commodity. I believe that sustainability can be fashionable and wearable at the same time.” Quote, Ardila.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Up-cycling, Reconstruction.
"UNI(RE)FORM" by Natalie Tzur. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“UNI(RE)FORM” by Natalie Tzur. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"UNI(RE)FORM" by Natalie Tzur. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“UNI(RE)FORM” by Natalie Tzur. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Natalie Tzur

Natalie Tzur is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019 and is currently studying Fashion Sustainability at the Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, Israel.

For her Redress Design Award collection ‘Uni(re)form’, Natalie taps into the prolific, but underutilized source of uniform waste. Reconstructing a variety of garments from different professions, she embraces the history of the piece by preserving the salient and valuable features of the uniform, whilst transforming them into unrecognisable silhouettes to bring renewed life.

“For me, fashion is a way of life and becoming a sustainable designer will give me the platform to bring about change on a small-scale level which can be magnified to a larger scale in the future. My project goes beyond just fashion – I’m constantly thinking about making the world a better and more pleasant place to live in.” Quote, Tzur.

DESIGN TECHNIQUE: Reconstruction
"Worn Well, Well Worn" by Julia English. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Worn Well, Well Worn” by Julia English. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

"Worn Well, Well Worn" by Julia English. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

“Worn Well, Well Worn” by Julia English. Courtesy of the Redress Design Award 2019. All rights reserved

Julia English

Julia English is a finalist of the Redress Design Award 2019. She holds a BA in Fashion (Design) from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia andis currently interning with sustainable fashion brands, A.BCH and Lois Hazel.

Every piece of clothing tells its own story. This is the inspiration behind Julia’s Redress Design Award collection, ‘Worn Well’. She applies the design techniques of up-cycling, reconstruction and zero-waste to a variety of textile waste and secondhand clothing, creating oversized, layered pieces that aim to bring the wearer in as a co-creator of an ever shifting garment, in order to build strong emotional attachments and increase functionality and longevity.

“I prefer the term fashion activist over sustainable designer – I use clothes as a medium to ask people about their own experience of fashion. Through addressing the space between purchase and end of life I believe we can comprehensively address what the future of fashion will be.” Quote, English.

DESIGN TECHNIQUES: Zero-waste, Up-cycling, Reconstruction

 

 

These emerging designers are offering us their views on the global cards humanity is dealing them, dictated by need and imagination instead of greed and exploitation, and in return ask us to support them in cleaning up the mess at hand.

 

#STAYTUNED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURED IMAGE: REDRESS DESIGN AWARD COMPETITION FINALISTS, 2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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Elsbeth van Paridon

China Fashion, Design and Urban Culture Groupie, Editor-in-Chief at Temper Magazine
Temper Magazine Founder and Editor-in-Chief Elsbeth van Paridon holds a degree in Sinology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) and additionally is just another run-of-the-mill fashion aficionada.

After tackling Beijing for some six years where she worked for China International Publishing Group, she spent a moment in time moseying down steep alleyways and writing about their fashionable and underground features in Hong Kong.

Van Paridon most recently managed to claw her way through a Europe-based academic endeavor called "Journalism". 'Tis in such fashion that she has now turned her lust for China Fashion/ Lifestyle and Underground into a full time occupation.

Van Paridon hunts down the latest in Chinese menswear, women’s clothing, designer newbies, established names, changes in the nation’s street scenery, close-ups of particular trends presently at play or of historical socio-cultural value in Chinaplus a selection of budding photographers.

Paired with a deep devotion to China’s urban underground scene, van Paridon holds a particular interest in the topics of androgyny, the exploration of individuality and the power that is the Key Opinion Leader (the local term for “influencers”) in contemporary China.
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