3   +   8   =  

For the record and to keep those non glow in the dark peeps at bay: Temper has the signed LGBTQ parental permission slip for the positive-only use of the term “queer” safely stashed in the cash ‘n candy pouch. Keywords at hand: Non-labeled, Deconstructivist, Androgynous| Genderf*ck, Club Kids, queer culture, contemporary art and Chinese elements. A verbal workout with designer Li Yiyang.

LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Raconteur and cultivator of dandy-flamby style Queer Supreme Quentin Crisp (1908-1999) once mused:

“The consuming desire of most human beings is deliberately to plant their whole life in the hands of some other person. I would describe this method of searching for happiness as immature. Development of character consists solely in moving toward self-sufficiency.”

In combining a celebration of sheer queer culture, fashion and be-bang be-bang weightlifter “guns”, designer Li Yiyang certainly has firmly taken control of his life. The question becomes…

How does the development of China’s fashion scene move toward the maturing of the nation’s LGBT community and culture? 

From LGBTQ Activism To  Brand 

Designer, outspoken LGBT activist and fitness fanatic. Li Yiyang (李益阳in Chinese) was born in a small city somewhere in central China and from an early age onward was highly influenced by his father’s teachings in traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy. Teenage Li went on to attend the Affiliated Art High School of China Academy of Art (CAA) and graduated with a degree in contemporary art. Currently living in Shanghai, Li set up his own brand — where deconstruvism meets positively constructive art: LYAN.

Li’s silhouettes present a mosaical imagery with his roots, the grounding roots of those central Chinese grasslands, running throughout like a thread made up of reflective badges. From birth to boyhood and an urban residential adult life in which a sexuality by individual choice and a society of non-exclusivity are key,

My art work or designs are not limited by my choices of medium or subject matter. I relate my work to my life experiences, as well as my personal and social identities. I wish to create art that society can relate to through a shared personal experience.” Designer li yiyang

Li’s designer collage respects tradition, yet at the same time strives to build something new, something modern and outspoken. His collage defends the right to just be who you are, all the while paying respect and tribute to the past struggles that have won China’s millennial generation the right to do just that. To just be you.

The outfits people wear, reveal the most obvious information about them as individuals in and to the world. As LI phrases it, “they represent our thoughts, they show a major glimpse of who we are, where we are going, what kind of person we want to be, what we are working toward and who we want to be”,

The outfits’ united hemlines are the soundtrack to one lifetime. 

LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Treading The Fine Genderless Line 

Speaking of revelations, when it comes to design aesthetic, Li draws the following never-conclusive and all-inclusive patterns:

“I’m breaking the boundaries between male and female, blurring the borders using Chinese elements – my roots – in a global and modern art/design environment, and touching upon the linings of contemporary fashion. After all… What defines ‘manly’ what constitutes ‘girly’? It’s a free life. celebrate it.”

Dress to the nines clad in a three-piece suit finished off with a pair of  high heels or throw on a fairytale skirt and tuck in that tuxedo shirt, The Stromae “Tous Les Mêmes” vibes are pervasive. The LYAN brand as well as its message are non-labeled. Very outspoken, and refreshingly so, when it comes to his sexuality, Li celebrates his love for (Shanghai’s) queer culture through art:

“This is who I am. Being gay and advocating a healthy environment that celebrates every and any type of (non-) sexuality is part of my roots. And my identity; it made who I am today, But this is not just about me, one Chinese gay man, this is about something bigger than one individual… It’s about the evolution of Chinese [urban] society.”

An increasing number of Chinese millennials in the past five years have joined the offline (i.e. physical) LGBT communities across the nation’s first-tier cities, Progressively comfortable with their sexual orientation, admittedly known or unknown to their next of kin, this generation moves forward China’s relatively newborn open and outspoken notion of equality in sexuality. China’s “other”-sexuals: From social sinners to soul-seeking saints in the time span of 20-something years.

Nevertheless, despite this spectacularly optimistic and colorful picture of the Middle Kingdom’s sexual urban landscape anno 2019, one must remember:

This evolution and sexual revolution take place mainly across the nation’s largest first-tier cities. More specifically, mainly across their all-embracing and exclusive niches of fashion, art and design. There is still much work to be done. Tread gently.

LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

That earring. 女|nǚ in Chinese translates as “woman”. LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

 

That earring. 女|nǚ in Chinese translates as "woman". LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

That earring. 女|nǚ in Chinese translates as “woman”. LYAN. Design by Li Yiyang, 2019. All rights reserved

 

That slogan. 你发我回|nǐ fā wǒ huí in Chinese translates as "you send, I reply". NPNC: No Pic, No Chat. Speaks for itself. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

That slogan. 你发我回|nǐ fā wǒ huí in Chinese translates as “you send, I reply”. NPNC: No Pic, No Chat. Speaks for itself. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Provocative Behaviorisms — Made In China

We’re talking hunks, twinks, twunks — and fashion. Better break out that Urban Dictionary.

The LGBT community culture is a huge part of fashion culture and, what’s more important slash relevant, it’s where Li’s core passion is at. “I love queer culture and its full-on expressionism, and my designs at times do take a very queer angle,” Li explains, “Take for example the male lingerie line I designed a while back. It would be nice to do some kind of photoshoot starring not just male models, but Chinese hunks, twinks, twunks, drag queens, the works. Not cliché, but cheeky.”

Mixing up the craft of clothing design and that of the visual kind leaves much room for interpretation to come to artistic fruition. Build an installation, put it on a model. Take the model, put them on a runway. Put on a show, a performance.

 

There are no borders when it comes to fashion. Li’s professional turn-ons are all about the meeting halfway of art and academics:

“I am no Mr. Know-It-All. I should have (and should still) read more books; I’m not that kind of art guy whose work is solely based on theories and you have to buy the manual to guide you through his collection. Let alone understand its core concept. I just want to create art that society can relate to through a shared personal experience.

The most important thing is for this new art to usher the public into a next social phase. Getting society to listen more, be more understanding and accepting. Let the public be ready for our community. The New Made In China.”

The crossroads where fashion meets art can introduce the world to  China’s modern LGBT scene, presenting both the good and the bad, the hopes and the struggles. Maturity in motion.

PINK. Is our new obsession. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

PINK. Is our new obsession. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

PINK. Is our new obsession. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

PINK. Is our new obsession. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

PINK. Is our new obsession. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

Genderless, Androgynous. Design by Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved

 

To wrap this up in sheer queer beauty, from 1931 London all the way to 2019 China, who else should we turn to but Mr. Crisp himself:

“The young always have the same problem — how to rebel and conform at the same time. They have now solved this by defying their parents and copying one another.”

End quote. Begin era.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Image: Courtesy of Li Yiyang for LYAN, 2019. All rights reserved
Spotted a fashion fail or have something to add? Please let us know in the comment section below or email us at info@temper-magazine.com
Copyright@Temper Magazine, 2019. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce Temper Magazine content without consent -– you can contact us at info@temper-magazine.com
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Elsbeth van Paridon

China Fashion, Design and Urban Culture Groupie, Editor-in-Chief at Temper Magazine
Temper Magazine Founder and Editor-in-Chief Elsbeth van Paridon holds a degree in Sinology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) and additionally is just another run-of-the-mill fashion aficionada.

After tackling Beijing for some six years where she worked for China International Publishing Group, she spent a moment in time moseying down steep alleyways and writing about their fashionable and underground features in Hong Kong.

Van Paridon most recently managed to claw her way through a Europe-based academic endeavor called "Journalism". 'Tis in such fashion that she has now turned her lust for China Fashion/ Lifestyle and Underground into a full time occupation.

Van Paridon hunts down the latest in Chinese menswear, women’s clothing, designer newbies, established names, changes in the nation’s street scenery, close-ups of particular trends presently at play or of historical socio-cultural value in Chinaplus a selection of budding photographers.

Paired with a deep devotion to China’s urban underground scene, van Paridon holds a particular interest in the topics of androgyny, the exploration of individuality and the power that is the Key Opinion Leader (the local term for “influencers”) in contemporary China.
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