0   +   7   =  

Blatantly boasting a soft spot for all that beckons the eye to travel, Temper has a history of musing over China’s much-merited fashion league that is the nation’s stylistically multi-versatile ethnic collective — including 55 minors plus one Hàn major. All political connotations and affirmations aside. Prepare to be blown away by the blazin’ and brazen flashes from the camera of photographer Irina Kovalchuk (MOOI Studio Beijing) as she uncovers China’s southcentral hidden gems. Up close and personal, we get. “From Far Away.”

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Bells, beads, and whistles in Qinghai province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Bells, beads, and whistles in Qinghai province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

About Miao Minority (苗族 in Chinese) socks, shoes, and feet, Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

About socks, shoes, and feet, Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Lugu Lake, Sichuan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Accessories call for beads. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Temple time calls for braids, no disrespect intended whatsoever, Qinghai province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Miao Minority (苗族 in Chinese) Embroidery, Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Chengdu, Sichuan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Dali, Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Cocky fashion statements in Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, "From Far Away," 2019. All rights reserved

Cocky fashion statements: French coins in Yunnan province. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved

 

 

China’s various traditional minority dress codes have had an extensive influence on clothing hangers nationwide, comprising the full scale from hard-to-handle fabrics to exuberant embroidery to fantastical earrings.

Leaving behind the Hàn majority(汉族| hànzú in Chinese) aka 91.59 percent of the overall Chinese population in 2019, the sometimes borderline overbearing accessories found across China’s most southern belt — featuring some of Mother Nature’s boldest, most bad*ss and most beautiful accomplishments, one might add — are not always meant for the fainthearted sleek style sense lovers, but oh well…

A little edge never hurt anyone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Irina Kovalchuk of MOOI Studio Beijing, “From Far Away,” 2019. All rights reserved. For more information, contact Kovalchuk via email:
irinamooistudio@gmail.com
THE IMAGERY IN THIS FEATURE BELONGS TO IRINA KOVALCHUK OF MOOI STUDIO BEIJING. ANY FORM OF REPRODUCTION WITHOUT PRIOR CONSENT IS PROHIBITED.
SPOTTED A FASHION FAIL OR HAVE SOMETHING TO ADD? PLEASE LET US KNOW IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW OR EMAIL US AT INFO@TEMPER-MAGAZINE.COM
COPYRIGHT@TEMPER MAGAZINE, 2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT REPRODUCE TEMPER MAGAZINE CONTENT WITHOUT CONSENT -– YOU CAN CONTACT US AT INFO@TEMPER-MAGAZINE.COM
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Elsbeth van Paridon

China Fashion, Design and Urban Culture Groupie, Editor-in-Chief at Temper Magazine
Temper Magazine Founder and Editor-in-Chief Elsbeth van Paridon holds a degree in Sinology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) and additionally is just another run-of-the-mill fashion aficionada.

After tackling Beijing for some six years where she worked for China International Publishing Group, she spent a moment in time moseying down steep alleyways and writing about their fashionable and underground features in Hong Kong.

Van Paridon most recently managed to claw her way through a Europe-based academic endeavor called "Journalism". 'Tis in such fashion that she has now turned her lust for China Fashion/ Lifestyle and Underground into a full time occupation.

Van Paridon hunts down the latest in Chinese menswear, women’s clothing, designer newbies, established names, changes in the nation’s street scenery, close-ups of particular trends presently at play or of historical socio-cultural value in Chinaplus a selection of budding photographers.

Paired with a deep devotion to China’s urban underground scene, van Paridon holds a particular interest in the topics of androgyny, the exploration of individuality and the power that is the Key Opinion Leader (the local term for “influencers”) in contemporary China.
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