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Trending: CHIcn — Puppet Masters, Poppy Surrealism And Animalistic Instincts

Self-portraits, self-examination, sinister surrealism. These are merely three associations from an alliance of ABCs when looking at the following contempo Chinese artists: Zhang Liang, Xu Zhongmin and Chen Hongzhu.

Superman, Red Bull, “Rebel Rebel” (in heels),… These household names have in common sets of colorifically symphonic collaborations sprouting from the newly found generational confidence very much alive and kicking with China’s post-80 and -90  creative collective. Temper shines a CHIcn light on three stand-up and stand-out such artists. It’s trending time!

Chen Hongzhu (2)
“What Is Memory II” by artist Chen Hongzhu. Image courtesy of HUA Gallery

Temper Magazine’s Trending segment casts a net upon all that is throwing tantrums within the world of China Fashion across a variety of global sources. This very necessary segment makes for a collection of largely non-Temper Magazine-original content dipping its toe into the deep indigo-dyed pool that is the ocean of Middle Kingdom fashionable astonishment. This time around…

Temper shows some pop-cultural love for CHIcn, a professional initiative for art management and development in cooperation with businesses. Upon breaking into the extensively treasure-filled CHIcn vault, one enters a world of new generational Chinese art from which we have chosen three colorful and critical hard hitters. Time to get poppin’ and lockin’!

“My work usually involves a lot of characters, and they are all based on real people. I hope it will hit you with an immediate blast of fun, energy and humorous nostalgia.” Quote, Zhang Liang.

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Zhang Liang

Zhang Liang — who also goes by the name “Ray” — was a student of renowned English puppet master John M. Blundall. Now, he spends his time between Beijing and London, where he works as a freelance illustrator. He makes bold, cartoon-esque work that pops with colour and character.

“My work usually involves a lot of characters, and they are all based on real people. I hope it will hit you with an immediate blast of fun, energy and humorous nostalgia.

I like to play with large blocks of bright colour using Photoshop to give my work more energy and fun. On occasion, I throw in some texture to enhance details. I enjoy picking colors, although this does take me a while!” Quote, Zhang Liang.

Swipe through Ray’s full lookbook right here, on CHIcn!

Websitezhangliangray.com
Weibo@插画师张亮
Facebook~/ZhangLiangRay
Instagram@zhangliangray

Armed with a blend of methods and means, Xu bravely ‘walks’ into the minds of audience, leaving space for thoughts behind the works.

Xu Zhongmin

If one would ever paint a portrait of modern Chinese art in personalities, Xu Zhongmin is undoubtedly there holding pride of place. After graduating from the prestigious Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts in 1987, he chaired the Ba Di Cao Arts Society for several years.

The artist in 1992 moved to live and work in London, immersing himself in the thriving global art scene and taking part in numerous exhibitions around the world from the UK and Europe to Japan, China and South Africa.

Working in many interdisciplinary ways and by means of different media including sculpture, installation, video, light and optical effects, the artist has developed his own unique visual surrealism. Armed with a blend of methods and means, Xu bravely ‘walks’ into the minds of audience, leaving space for thoughts behind the works.

Treat yourself to some visually surreal artistic bites right here, on CHIcn!

Instagram: #xuzhongmin

My paintings often obscure the boundary between man and animal and in this way display an even clearer view of humankind.” Quote, Chen Hongzhu.

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Cheng Hongzhu

Chen Hongzhu is one of the New Generation of Chinese Women. Confident and rebellious, she graduated from the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts and her work has already been picked up by ueber-collector of contempo Chinese art Uli Sigg. Influenced by American painters such as Mark Ryden and John Currin, her zoomorphic self-portraits meld surrealism with self-examination.

“I believe that in every person’s heart live two children — one that turns to the light and another that feeds on darkness. Your entire life you must look after and appease these two children. I often paint people and animals together because I feel animals embody a kind of collective human unconscious. Our inner naive and reclusive self can be expressed well by the animals, almost as if they are mirrors showing a reflection of humanity. My paintings often obscure the boundary between man and animal and in this way display an even clearer view of humankind.” Quote, Chen Hongzhu.

Her paintings portray female beauties often accompanied by fantastical yet realistic animals. After a first glance, these apparently impeccable dolls reveal some sinister signs such as subtle cuts and dripping blood. Combining sweet memories of childhood with the harsh reality of adulthood Chen creates stunning fairy tales characters through playful and dreamlike colours and compositions.

Catch the Chen rebellious chic streak right here, on CHIcn!

 

“Creativity takes courage” Quote, Henri Matisse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All content was originally written by  and for CHIcn, 2018. All rights reserved
Additional editing by Elsbeth van Paridon for Temper Magazine
Contact CHIcn via email: we@chi-china.net
Featured image: Artist Zhang “Ray” Liang. Image courtesy of CHIcn 
Temper Magazine does not own any of the above English content. All featured English content was re-published by Temper Magazine and originally belongs to CHIcn, 2018. All rights reserved.

 

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Elsbeth van Paridon

China Fashion/ Urban Lifestyle Expert, Editor-in-Chief at Temper Magazine
Elsbeth van Paridon holds a degree in Sinology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) and additionally is just another run-of-the-mill fashion aficionada.

After tackling Beijing for some six years where she worked for China International Publishing Group, she spent a moment in time moseying down steep alleyways and writing about their fashionable and underground features in Hong Kong.

Van Paridon most recently managed to claw her way through a Europe-based academic endeavor called "Journalism". 'Tis in such fashion that she has now turned her lust for China Fashion/ Lifestyle and Underground into a full time occupation.

Van Paridon hunts down the latest in Chinese menswear, women’s clothing, designer newbies, established names, changes in the nation’s street scenery, close-ups of particular trends presently at play or of historical socio-cultural value in Chinaplus a selection of budding photographers.

Paired with a deep devotion to China’s urban underground scene, van Paridon holds a particular interest in the topics of androgyny, the exploration of individuality and the power that is the Key Opinion Leader (the local term for “influencers”) in contemporary China.
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