China Fashion Finds

Jessica Rapp For Jing Daily: China’s KOL Case.

State-run media organization “China Daily” cites the video-streaming ban as "the result of a lack of licensing" and a response to the screening of politically-related content “that does not conform with state rules.” Jesscia Rapp reports for Jing Daily.

Chinese regulators on June 23 shut down web-casting services on popular platforms in China for violating government standards by broadcasting negative commentary on political and social news. Jessica Rapp reports for Jing Daily.  

 

Temper Magazine’s Trending segment casts a net upon all that is throwing tantrums within the world of China Fashion across a variety of global sources. This very necessary segment makes for a collection of largely non-Temper Magazine-original content dipping its toe into the deep indigo-dyed pool that is the ocean of Middle Kingdom fashionable astonishment.

 

China’s recent crackdown on social media web-casting services is cause for concern among China’s influencers — aka Key Opinion Leaders (KOLs). Jessica Rapp sums things up for Jing Daily.

In the wake of the crackdown, many luxury brands have been wondering if their official accounts might be affected, if at all, and how they should respond to the recent events.

The Chinese government on June 8 shuttered 60 accounts on some of the biggest social media platforms, including WeChat and Sina Weibo, among others, for publishing celebrity news and gossip because they undermined socialist values. Beijing’s Cyberspace Administration ordered internet companies including Tencent and Baidu to “take effective measures to contain the glorification of scandals and the private lives of celebrities, the sensationalization of their conspicuous consumption and low taste.

The entertainment accounts that were closed included both self-run blogs and major ones like Harper’s Bazaar, which is owned by Trends Media Group (a Chinese company established by Hearst), and For Him Magazine (a Chinese company established by British Bauer Media).

 

In an effort to give some insight into this murky subject, we communicated with a senior associate of a global PR agency with offices in Beijing, that works with the top luxury brands. She spoke with us over the WeChat messaging service on condition of anonymity for fear of repercussions from the Chinese government.

For the full Jing Daily interview, click here!

Weibo is the most well-known of the platforms affected — the microblogging site currently boasts more than 300 million monthly active users and surpassed Twitter in market value earlier this year.

Fast forward a few weeks and Chinese regulators on June 23 shut down web-casting services including live-streaming, on three popular platforms in China — Sina Weibo, news portal iFeng, and video-streaming site AcFun — for violating government standards by broadcasting negative commentary on political and social news.
The ban, which was posted on the website of the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT), has caused Weibo’s shares to drop and potentially shrouds the future of other major live-streaming and short video services in uncertainty.

 

Watch this short introduction to China’s KOL marketing courtesy of ParkLu (and the PARKLU Youtuube Channel), a platform “connecting leading brands with more than 500 million consumers in China through influencer marketing.”

Weibo is the most well-known of the platforms affected — the microblogging site currently boasts more than 300 million monthly active users and surpassed Twitter in market value earlier this year. The company had been making major investments in video just as live-streaming began to take off among China’s millennial mobile users and as luxury KOLs pivoted to the platform for an audio-visual supplement to WeChat marketing. In the second half of 2016, short video contributed to 10 percent of its ad revenue, which jumped 40 percent year-over-year. State-run media organization “China Daily” cited the video-streaming ban was the result of a lack of licensing and a response to the screening of politically-related content “that does not conform with state rules.”

 

The ban shrouds the future of other major live-streaming and short video services in uncertainty and has caused some consternation within the KOL community.

In the wake of a “comeback” set to rival WeChat’s social media marketing success story, Weibo had reportedly already been considering taking steps to regulate users who were operating as KOLs on the platform, according to China influencer marketing platform ParkLu. The alleged new rules discourage users from linking to its competitor, WeChat, and penalize links to e-commerce sites outside of Alibaba, as well as QR codes.

As far as where this might be headed, Bloomberg’s “Gadfly” column notes it is common that, “new businesses are allowed to flourish before having their wings clipped when they get too big or unwieldy,” but that there are, in fact, up-and-coming video-streaming platforms operating with the necessary licenses. One such platform is Momo, whose stocks were also negatively affected on Thursday morning by SAPPRFT’s announcement.

 

The ban, which was posted on the website of the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT), shrouds the future of other major live-streaming and short video services in uncertainty and has caused some consternation in the community of influencers, or KOLs, and luxury brands who work with them.

 

Jing Daily reached out to one popular KOL who works with major luxury brands who spoke to us, on condition of anonymity, about how KOLs are taking the news. This influencer touches on the news about the KOL “rules” that were recently outlined by ParkLu, which have been difficult to verify and says at least one of them is having a major impact on KOLs and luxury brands.

 

For the full Jing Daily KOL interview, click here !

On a final updated note, then. Weibo on June 29 gave into government pressure to shut down accounts which unsettled the one-party state’s rulers in Beijing. According to Josh Loeb of E&T, the firm stated it would “prefer to self-censor rather than be forcibly closed, going on the record saying that it would “work with state media, such as the Xinhua news agency and the People’s Daily, to promote a mainstream discourse in the future.” Unlicensed television and film content, as well as videos longer than 15 minutes, will also be banned on its platforms, Weibo said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This trending topic is the sum of three reports written by Jessica Rapp for Jing Daily 2017 All rights reserved
Featured Image: Courtesy of ParkLu and Jing Daily.
Passionate about style and design, Jessica has been writing about China’s emerging independent fashion scene and the country’s creative industries since moving to Beijing in 2011. She spent two years covering the capital’s dynamic fashion world in depth as style editor of the Beijinger magazine and her work has also been published in Dwell, Design Sponge, Roads and Kingdoms, Melting Butter, and Artnet News. Follow Rapp on Twitter: @jrapppp
Temper Magazine does not own any of the above English content. All featured English content belongs to Jessica Rapp for Jing Daily 2017. All rights reserved.
Chinese translation: Li “Lily” Dan of Kitayama Studio for Temper Magazine.