Art Close-Ups Society The Vanity Issue

China’s Drag Queens. Fashion That Is Non-Binary Identification  

Homosexuality in China was decriminalised in 1997 and in 2001 removed from the government’s list of mental disorders. Though perhaps not entirely overlapping, this in turn has propelled China’s drag scene to evolve relatively quickly. The world of drag may be in its comparative infancy here, yet despite ongoing media and censorship issues this doesn’t seem to stop the rhetoric in China surrounding its rise.

When we think of drag, we may not necessarily think of China. However, sexuality and gender fluidity are very much alive in China’s rapidly changing social landscape, as is the slowly-rising drag queen scene. Temper tasty Emily Aspinall explores the country’s evolving relationship with non-binary identification.

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine's "The Vanity Issue". Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved
Design by Atelier Rouge Pékin. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine’s “The Vanity Issue”. Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved

The Evolution Of Drag In The East

Contemporary China is what we can describe as a rapidly developing country, but not just in an economic sense, a social one too, and over the past few decades an ardent desire for sex equality has developed. However, this hasn’t always been the case- it is important to remember the past. Let’s begin by taking the Peking opera as an example which, at the outset, was initially an exclusively male pursuit. The Qianlong Emperor had banned all female performers in Beijing in 1772 but that didn’t stop men playing iconic female roles. In fact, these roles were held in the highest of esteem.

Back East, it’s tricky to define when drag queen culture became prevalent, as the first recorded use of “drag” referred to actors dressed in women’s clothing is from 1870. Chinese actor and cultural treasure Mei Lanfang is a good starting point. He was exclusively known for his female lead roles (dan) and particularly his “verdant-robed girls” (qingyi), young or middle-aged women of grace and refinement. Donning his intricately beautiful head ware and blushed painted pink cheeks, Mei’s iconic and flawless movement from handsome man to elegant women was a fascination of, not only the Chinese, but audiences around the world. Mei is like a century-old open expression of LGBT identity and drag style.

“VICE China recently highlighted the situation of drag queens in the East with their documentary about drag and gender diversity: ‘Young People: Making Your Own Empress’. One protagonist in the show is Frozen Lolita, a ‘futuristic androgyny’-themed drag queen from Beijing.”

Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine's "The Vanity Issue". Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved
Design by Sarah Ferragni, Raffles Design Institute Beijing. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine’s “The Vanity Issue”. Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved

Drag, A Western ‘Phenomenon’?

Venturing into the 21st century, drag queens are now a more visible part of art and culture. Particularly in the West, drag culture is bigger than it ever has been, with exposed platforms like reality TV providing us with series “RuPaul’s Drag Race”. Last year, the show had its most successful season, building incredible viewing figures and followings via social media. Before this, drag was submerged in underground clubs and back-alley bars. It is these mainstream shows that remove the stigma around drag- all around the world.

Drag queens have in the West over the years become household names, with Dame Edna Everage and Pepper LaBeija just two at the forefront of the mind. This gets one to thinking… What, then, is the Chinese equivalent to these famous drag queens? And does that even exist?

Neil Lee by Tom Selmon
Neil “Frozen Lolita” Lee shot by Tom Selmon at his home in Beijing. Courtesy of Tom Selmon

Well, only very recently, VICE China highlighted the situation of drag queens in the East with their documentary about drag and gender diversity. “Young People: Making Your Own Empress” discusses how Chinese young people will recognize “another me” when Western culture enters a repressed Chinese context.” One of the two protagonists in the show is Frozen Lolita, a “futuristic androgyny”-themed drag queen from Beijing.

The documentary shows that drag is way more than just glitz, glamour and two puffs of blusher. In fact, Frozen Lolita spends a meticulous amount of time planning and creating her make-up and costumes. Squeezing into tight corsets, shaving and plucking to absolute perfection. Much time, thought and energy goes into making themselves look stage-ready. The documentary depicts how preparation doesn’t always come easy.

Who knows, it might not be long until “Frozen Lolita” is a household name across China — just as “RuPaul: has become a brand in herself across the U.S.

China’s Sina Weibo platform in April of 2018 announced that — for the next three months — it would be having a “clean up”, removing pictures “with pornographic implications, promoting bloody violence, or related to homosexuality”.

Neil Lee by Tom Selmon
Neil “Frozen Lolita” Lee shot by Tom Selmon at his home in Beijing. Courtesy of Tom Selmon

A Censored Identity

China’s ever changing social landscape, does produce some issues, though. China’s Sina Weibo platform in April 2018 stated that — for the next three months — it would be having a “clean up”, removing pictures “with pornographic implications, promoting bloody violence, or related to homosexuality”. In response, Weibo users posted photos with their partners and families, under the #iamgay. This backlash from the Chinese citizens is refreshing, a positive outcome (Weibo changed course) and a chance to eliminate discrimination. But, the ban still speaks of the pressure media companies face in China to produce content deemed ‘proper’ by the authorities.

It is important to remember that in China, gender equality has come a long way. Confucianism, the ancient religion and philosophy of China, had a strong belief in maintaining men’s dominance over women; trans women were therefore viewed as shameful for expressing a lower status.

Homosexuality was decriminalised in 1997 and in 2001 removed from the government’s list of mental disorders. This means China’s drag scene has evolved relatively quickly. However, the drag scene is in its comparative infancy here and despite the ongoing media and censorship issues, it doesn’t seem to stop the rhetoric in China surrounding the rise of drag. What’s more, technological advancements in China have also helped promote greater awareness about drag in youth culture- WeChat groups are rife, and we can see more and more trans-identifying characters in movies (which we can now access through western media, score!).

“The Shanghai drag scene is booming. More and more drag queens will emerge from behind the curtains, this is with the help of new venues, parties and designers all coming out to support drag.” Timothy Parent of China Fashion Bloggers

Design by Atelier Rouge Pkin. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine's "The Vanity Issue". Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved
Design by Atelier Rouge Pekin. Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio) for Temper Magazine’s “The Vanity Issue”. Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved

The Tidal Waves Of Time

Temper spoke to our much beloved Timothy Parent from China Fashion Bloggers to get his opinion on the matters at hand. If he were to describe drag in Shanghai in one word, it would be “booming”. Parent, a judge on several a drag show jury in China said, “You used to be able to count the known drag queens on one hand and now there are dozens in Shanghai.” According to him, in the past two years, we have seen an upsurge of new drag queens emerging onto the scene, as the interest in drag, competitions and parties grows.

Looking towards the future, Parent predicts more and more drag queens will emerge from behind the curtains, this is with the help of new venues, parties and designers all coming out to support drag.

Androgynous style, or gender fluidity has always been markedly popular in China (somewhat unknowingly), with gender-fluid looks dating as far back as the Mao suit. With drag art, fashion, networks and nightclubs galore in Beijing and Shanghai, let’s hope to see this immersive scene extending outside of these big cities and around China. Who knows? We may see the glitz and glamour of drag hitting the streets and catwalks of China very soon. The sky is the limit for drag in China. And we wouldn’t expect any less of this ever-changing country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Elsbeth van Paridon for Temper Magazine
Photography by Irina Kovalchuk (Beijing MOOI Studio — IG: @mooi_studio) for Temper Magazine’s “The Vanity Issue”, #2, 2018. Copyright @Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved
The content and imagery in this feature originally appeared in Temper Magazine’s “The Vanity Issue”, No. 2, 2018. Any form of reproduction without prior consent is prohibited.
Copyright@Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved