Influencers streetstyle Take Five

New York-Based Fashion Writer Mary Anderson. Back To Black|No Pastels

Mary Anderson. Seasoned fashion writer, freelance media reporter and currently documentary maker, Anderson and Temper talk the talk. As we walk the DUMBO walk.

Anderson and Temper host a highly private press junket as the topics of discussion range from fashion documentaries and the monochrome mania embedded in that New York soil, to tokenized consumerism and seasonal sparks flying. Time to take five and gain some first-hand “how to” insights in a New York dash with a New Made In China splash.

Heads up: Visit Anderson’s fabulous body of freelance writings right here on What Matters To Mary.

Eileen McLAin 2
A compilation of street fashion illustrations from the subways of New York City. Created by Eileen McLain

Take 1: How to… Define pretty little fashion things?

Anderson: Although I personally love all black looks, soft pastels and millennial pink is a very popular aesthetic in NYC right now. If someone does wear all black, I’ve observed that they may include a statement piece that adds a splash of color. If they wear pastels, then it’s a strong sweetness by way of minimalism.

When it comes to accessories, I think they can be great investment pieces.  A popular brand I’ve seen around NYFW have been the Mansur Gavriel bags that have the minimalism and versatility that I (and many New Yorkers) love.

For the holidays, I still stick to black, but I may do a shimmery accessory such as glittery heels, tights, or head-to-toe if I’m feeling bold! Definitely a simple way to stand out in group holiday photos.

Take 2: How to… Describe The New Made In China from the outside?

Anderson: I think it’s important to build a bridge between East and West creators, because we have a lot to learn from each other. The West could do more to learn and familiarize ourselves with Chinese designers, and develop a better appreciation and awareness for Chinese creatives.

Social media is a powerful resource! It’s an inexpensive way to educate yourself not only on local trends, but also those on the other side of the world simply through a hashtag.

Also, I believe that the Chinese fashion community should be valued beyond their buying power by the West. They have a network of successful designers, editors, models, and photographers. Instead of only valuing their buying power and tokenizing them as consumers, I believe true inclusivity is incorporating them as decision-makers and giving Chinese creatives a true platform, which makes Temper Magazine such an awesome initiative!

As someone who grew up mostly around affordable luxury, (but never afraid to splurge now and then) I’m looking forward to learning about not just the high-end Chinese brands, but also the more affordable (and still high quality of course) Chinese designers that Western consumers can support.

Mary Anderson by Charlene Thomas. Image courtesy of Mary Anderson
Mary Anderson by Charlene Thomas. Anderson’s bag is from Mansur Gavriel and the jacket is her father’s high school cardigan (vintage, 1971). Image courtesy of Mary Anderson

Take 3: How to… Stave off the East-West divide?

Anderson: Social media is a powerful resource! It’s an inexpensive way to educate yourself not only on local trends, but also those on the other side of the world simply through a hashtag. Even if you’re not fluent in another language, the power of beautiful images transcends words.

The Chinese fashion community should be valued beyond their buying power by the West. Tokenizing them as consumers is too limited a view.

Take 4: How to… Protect your feet from the New York street?

Anderson: I’m all about function, so I’d say cute but comfortable shoes or boots, especially as winter arrives! If you decide to do a heel, I’d suggest it be sturdy so that you can go from work to an event to a cocktail party and not have sore feet when you get home! Also, there are plenty of trendy flats that can be just as versatile.

A compilation of street fashion illustrations from the subways of New York City. Created by Eileen McLain
A compilation of street fashion illustrations from the subways of New York City. Created by Eileen McLain

Take 5: How to…. Become a bona fide fashion writer?

Anderson: Read, study and soak up as much as you can, whether it be magazines, biographies or films, so that you’re well-versed on the topic. Also, make sure to intern! It’s a great way to network and gain experience by observing the best in the industry. Plus, don’t ever be afraid to reach out to whoever you admire in the industry.

 

Fashion is like a colorful film of great magnitude, where different people from all different walks of life find common ground. Each individual provides a different hue and perspective. Monochrome and all black may well be our personal styles, but fashion per definition runs across the rainbow-inspired spectrum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured image: Mary Anderson by Charlene Thomas. Anderson’s bag is from Mansur Gavriel and the jacket is her father’s high school cardigan (vintage, 1971)
Contact Mary Anderson via:
  • Email: whatmatterstomary@gmail.com
  • Website: www.whatmatterstomary.com
  • Instagram: @whatmatterstomary
Illustrations by Eileen McLain: Support McLain on Kickstarter right here!

 

Copyright@Temper Magazine, 2018. All rights reserved
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Elsbeth van Paridon

China Fashion/ Urban Lifestyle Expert, Editor-in-Chief at Temper Magazine
Elsbeth van Paridon holds a degree in Sinology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) and additionally is just another run-of-the-mill fashion aficionada.

After tackling Beijing for some six years where she worked for China International Publishing Group, she spent a moment in time moseying down steep alleyways and writing about their fashionable and underground features in Hong Kong.

Van Paridon most recently managed to claw her way through a Europe-based academic endeavor called "Journalism". 'Tis in such fashion that she has now turned her lust for China Fashion/ Lifestyle and Underground into a full time occupation.

Van Paridon hunts down the latest in Chinese menswear, women’s clothing, designer newbies, established names, changes in the nation’s street scenery, close-ups of particular trends presently at play or of historical socio-cultural value in Chinaplus a selection of budding photographers.

Paired with a deep devotion to China’s urban underground scene, van Paridon holds a particular interest in the topics of androgyny, the exploration of individuality and the power that is the Key Opinion Leader (the local term for “influencers”) in contemporary China.
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