The Photographers

2017’s Must-See Chinese Photographers: Focus!

Transcending geographic locations, the work of today's new wave of Chinese photographers bridges the gap to engage and intrigue local and overseas audiences alike.

Whereas Chen Man may have officially put Chinese photographers on the world map, there are many newer names to feature! Temper Magazine Contributor Sandy Chu goes shutterbug-undercover.

From beautifully artistic painting-like photo finishes to the more widely palatable medium of street photography, contemporary China offers a diverse array of talent to watch.

Whereas China’s best-known photography export aka celebrated celeb and celeb fashion photographer Chen Man may have officially put Chinese photographers on the world map helping to perk global interest in the country’s young creative photography talent, there still are many newer names on the need-to-see-now list.

Who are the contemporary photographers of China? They’re as diverse as the country itself presenting a visual led narrative of these individuals’ interests, aesthetics and experiences that truly represents the dizzying diversity of the nation. As rich kaleidoscope of viewpoints, there is no one China.

If anything, their distinct voices all help to weave a rich tapestry of open-mindedness that defines the country’s modern sense of fashion and creativity. There is equal room for futurism, a contemporary take on the past as there is for the joie de vie of street fashion. There’s room for subculture, youth, alternative females and the domestic view of the world that is largely limited to the country’s native audience that goes beyond the cliché of a homogenous China that exists in the realms of the mind at home and abroad but not in the reality of today.

From beautifully artistic painting-like photo finishes to the aesthetic of digital reimagining, along with the more widely palatable medium of street photography, contemporary China offers a diverse array of talent to watch. Let’s take off the long-distance lens and put the focus on a few must-sees in the world of China Photography.

Liu Cunjun Vogue Italia
Roman Holiday: Liu shoots for Vogue Italia. Copyright@Vogue Italia

 

Liu Cunjun

Born in Qingdao, Liu Cunjun was first exposed to the world of photography in 2010. While visiting his cousin’s studio he was fascinated by the interaction between the photographer and his subjects, customers and models. Liu gradually began to shoot and after training for four years he developed his understanding the creative field. Liu in 2014 relocated to Beijing where he began to pursue the field of fashion photography.

Asked by Temper Magazine what makes China and China Fashion interesting in se, Liu replies: “I do not want the work to be called China fashion or what not, I am interested in doing some element of fusion, I will shoot a lot of Chinese faces, but I think this will not define Chinese fashion, it does not belong to any country. My grandfather is a doctor of Chinese medicine what I want to do is a combination of Western medicine fashion :), Chinese history is approximately 5000 years long, there are many elements of fashion culture which have yet to be mined. I will use the combination of Chinese and Western approaches as a means to present some Chinese elements, which I have always been doing.”

 

Ka Xiaoxi -Chen-Yu-Shanghai
Shanghai’s Blockrockin’ 2015 Beats. Copyright@Ka Xiaoxi for Beats by Dre

 

Ka Xiaoxi

Having shot features for major names including Dazed Digital and VICE China, Ka Xiaoxi’s photography focuses on capturing the ephemeral, raw beauty of youth. Providing a candid look at nightlife culture, Ka’s work lifts the curtain on contemporary China providing an engaging visual narrative that bridges cultures. The Shanghai based photographer and curator has already garnered an impressive client list of international and local need to know labels including Adidas, Converse and Chinese contemporary brand Zuczug.

A talent to watch, Ka’s work has been published across a series of limited edition books including “Never Say Goodbye to Planet Booze”, “Light Room” and “A Fragment of China’s Youth”.

hefei 001
Five Nights, Aquarium. Copyright@Zhang Wenxin

 

Zhang Wenxin

An MFA graduate of the California College of Arts, Zhang Wenxin is the embodiment of Chinese multi-local whose global outlook informs her creative perspective. Selected as the British Journal of Photograph’s 2016 New Talent, Zhang explores “the intricate relationship between the real and the fabricated, creating multipart projects that unearth the complex layers of delusion and estrangement embedded within her non-linear imagery. Her work functions as a kind of literary device from which the viewer can reconstruct a fictional narrative. Zhang’s process often begins with her personal experience and carefully tends to metaphoric and marginalized stories so as to unveil larger questions about the suppressed.”

The Goethe Institut in 2017 commissioned an online project from Zhang named “Excerpts From A Polymorphic Expedition”, as seen in this piece’s featured image”, which explores the iconic Western theme of “Odyssey”.

Sun Jun

A trending topic on creative microblogs on WeChat last year, Sun Jun has shot some of China’s most famous faces – think Sun Li, Fan Bingbing, Du Juan for local editions of international magazines including Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar. Known for his modern renaissance style photography which combines elements of traditional Chinese painting, Sun is a graduate of the prestigious China Academy of Art. His signature style as earned him accolades as ‘new cultural painting photographer’.

Roy Zhang
2012. Copyright@The Shanghai Express

 

Roy Zhang

Born and raised in Shanghai, Roy Zhang has oft been compared to The Sartorialist’s Scott Schuman. Known for his candid street photography that is defined by his knack for capturing both fun and fabulousness, professionally Zhang has worked international brands such as Miu Miu and shot famous faces such as supermodel Ming Xi and actress Zhou Dongyu.

Luo Yang

Take a look at this artiste’s bigtime non-HBO miniseries “Girls”, an ongoing project which first saw the light in 2008. (Courtesy of The Thing About Art YouTube Channel):

Featured online by the BBC, Luo Yang’s work focuses on the Chinese female as her reoccurring subject. Beginning in 2007 Luo has been shooting her continuing series of photography called ‘Girls’. She describes her portraits as “images that depict an emerging Chinese subculture that defies imposed expectations and stereotypes – GIRLS are bad-assed and self-aware, yet insecure, vulnerable and torn, with a supreme sense of cool. Underlying tensions and ambivalent emotions animate Luo’s images, which, above all, testify to the GIRLS’ individuality. They thus reflect a shifting mindset with regard to concepts of femininity and identity in present-day China.”

JPGS
The streets are talking. Copyright@JiePaiGunshu Sina Weibo

Jie Pai Gunshu

With 1.67 million followers on Sina Weibo, “Jie Pai Gunshu” (“街拍滚叔” literally means “street photography gets lost brother”) is one of the country’s most locally well-known street photographers. Shooting clean contemporary styles that range from elegant, cute to youth, the Hangzhou-based photographer provides a commercial look at what’s locally considered polished and stylish. Having established himself as a successful creative, Jie Pai Gunshu also travels to international fashion events such as Pitti Uomo to provide globally content locally curated for his Chinese followers.

 

 

With Chinese photographers openly embracing an international mindset while maintaining their own cultural perspective, today’s new wave of photographers is steadily making a name for themselves that is just as relevant, if not more, beyond its own borders. Transcending geographic locations, their work is bridging the gap to engage and intrigue local and overseas audiences alike.

 

 

 

 

Written by Sandy Chu for Temper Magazine 2017 All rights reserved
About Sandy Chu: Chu works at WGSN, writing gated B2B content for Asia product trends, Chinese consumer insights and Chinese marketing trends. Her regular work remits focus on identifying and analyzing commercial trends, but on a personal level she retains a captivated interest in creative merit and cultural insights around China. Making her one finely befitted and bedazzled addition to the Temper Magazine contributor team.
Edited by Elsbeth van Paridon for Temper Magazine
Chinese translation by Li “Lily” Dan of Kitayama Studio
Featured image: Copyright@Zhang Wenxin. “EXCERPTS FROM A POLYMORPHIC EXPEDITION”, an
online project commissioned by the Goethe Institut 2017
Copyright@Temper Magazine 2017 All rights reserved